Steeper Digs

     Was that an ibex vanishing, a moment ago, into the greens
surrounding the falls in a far country,
     into the mists, away, like grace hoped on and more your own
as it eludes you? And who,
     after some twenty-five Ohio summertimes, can resist the whim
so not to follow now, imagining
     another year of it, with points you must make points of, for any
chance to be convincing,
     with the details and desires, yes, and books you might actually
be changed by still to get to,
     the peas and the onion sets begun, and that ibex vanishing, into
that brightening and rain in store
     since it's the season, whatever the tin man thinks, or the tan man
makes of it, of this second
     deer at the fenced edge of woods and greening field. So much
for the values cached, assessed
     in mobile calls and in-dash videos, for these containment stones,
this steep dig announcing
     steeper digs to follow, and for this deer about to bound, then
stymied, with fields ahead
     or state groves to adventure, through the brightening or shade
a day in the mid-nineties
     might make welcome, but, for a moment or so, considering,
with how many deer minds
     to turn him from that long gaze back to shadows, which,
in time being,
     makes me smile, even the tin man say, the tan man
reasoning
     on local makes and matters, earlier
evening
          beverages.





About the Author:
Robert Lietz is the author of eight published collections of poems, including Running in Place (L’Epervier Press), At Park and East Division (L’Epervier Press), The Lindbergh Half-century (L’Epervier Press), The Inheritance (Sandhills Press), and Storm Service (Basfal Books). Basfal also published After Business in the West: New and Selected Poems. Over seven hundred of his poems have been published in print and on-line journals, including recent publications in Istanbul Literary Review, The Pittsburgh Quarterly Online, Avatar, Contrary, Terrain, Valparaiso Review, Salt River Review, and Lily. Several unpublished collections are currently finished and ready for publication, including West of Luna Pier, Spooking in the Ruins, Keeping Touch, Character in the Works: Twentieth Century Lives, The Vanishing, and Eating Asiago & Drinking Beer. Meanwhile, he keeps active writing and exploring his interest in digital photography and image processing and their relationship to the development of his poetry.

JUST A SCHEME

     Several days of nineties turn rain, relief, parcels of rain and light,
and fifty or so miles history, open land, and
we'll suppose, potential yields, a measuring you might think personal,
getting your sense of truth from the plain facts,
from details, and from the looks and gestures, meant, we are sure,
to tell us more than keeping busy, beneath
this lilac bridge, where he's pulled off to court some problem, wishing
he'd tarped the load to start, a mood I must leave to him,
with lamentations from Lake Erie, since more than rivers burn, and
more can be lost than franchise standings
with an absence, lost as these seem to be on another post-Fourth Friday,
where the cross-routes lead to Cleveland or the Capital, points
west, as we shall see, and home again to Sebring, through the perennial,
it seems, Mansfield re-surfacing, the tire-shard closed lane
and shoulder, beneath this quantum-clustering grey the grey light
brines and then gives up on, slowed here and drained,
likea show too long in syndication. Can you believe it's two months plus,
and how the tea-party gloms, reiterates, pressing that ardor say,
the new power just a scheme they claim to wreck the commonwealth,
and that free-flow Babel millionaire households stand to thrive by,
inciting the partier queens and courts and randy consorts,
with BP, imagine it, the suffering servant of their interests, the victim
of civil whims, so that the millionaires blab on, glib-tongued,
and armed, coaxing the likes, be sure, of already stressed earners,
cast to slip into the behaviors they're expecting. No wonder
LeBron's picked sun-light over the tea-hued winter twilights
in these parts, hearing the millionaires persist,
with their chickens still to hatch, making themselves
more widely known than his sweetness,
and charming their fans, as he might his, from
the tundra and steppes, from
the white-out, say, of a long-suffered
     argument.

About the Author: Robert Lietz is the author of eight published collections of poems, including Running in Place (L’Epervier Press,). At Park and East Division (L’Epervier Press,) The Lindbergh Half-century (L’Epervier Press,) The Inheritance (Sandhills Press,) and Storm Service (Basfal Books). Basfal also published After Business in the West: New and Selected Poems. Over seven hundred of his poems have been published in print and on-line journals, including recent publications in Istanbul Literary Review, The Pittsburgh Quarterly Online, Avatar, Contrary, Terrain, Valparaiso Review, Salt River Review, and Lily. Several unpublished collections are currently finished and ready for publication, including West of Luna Pier, Spooking in the Ruins, Keeping Touch, Character in the Works: Twentieth Century Lives, The Vanishing, and Eating Asiago & Drinking Beer. Meanwhile, he keeps active writing and exploring his interest in digital photography and image processing and their relationship to the development of his poetry.